Giovanni d'Alemagna (working in Venice and Padua from 1437 to 1450) and Antonio Vivarini (Venice 1420 cc-Venice before 1484) - inv. 1570

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Titolo: 
The Virgin and Child Enthroned with Two Angels
Numero di Inventario: 
1570
Tipologia: 
paintings
Collezione: 

Painting

Classe iconografica: 
Religious
Parole chiave soggetto: 
The Virgin and the Child
angels
Motivo attribuzione: 
bibliography
Autore, ambito, luogo di produzione: 
Giovanni d'Alemagna (died in 1450) and Antonio Vivarini (c. 1420-died before 1484)
Ambito e luogo di produzione: 
Padova
Padua
Veneto
Italy
Periodo: 
1400
Datazione specifica: 
1449-1450
Libri correlati: 
Pubblicazione: 
Si
Materia e Tecnica: 
tempera on panel
Data di Ingresso: 
1879
Acquisizione: 
Gian Giacomo Poldi Pezzoli
Tipo di acquisizione: 
bequest
Tipo di collocazione: 
on display
Collocazione: 
Golden Room

The Virgin holds the standing Child on her knee as she sits on a throne. It is surrounded by a meadow of flowers, an allusion to the hortus conclusus, the enclosed garden symbolising virginal purity, which probably continued in the other panels of a larger work. Monumental and imposing, this painting was possibly the central panel of a polyptych with Saint Louis of Toulouse, now at Louvre, and Saint Ambrose and Saint Nicholas now in Venice (Seminario Patriarcale).

Together with Jacopo Bellini, Antonio Vivarini led a renewal in Venetian painting during the mid-15th century and, combining tradition and innovation, produced a large number of polyptychs which were exported along the Adriatic coast. The head of a family workshop, Antonio worked for many years with his brother-in-law, of German origin, called Giovanni d’Alemagna. In 1447, the two artists moved to Padua, where they saw the new Renaissance works by Squarcione and especially by Donatello.

Datable to 1449-1450, this beautiful painting is one of their best collaborations. Late Gothic elements coexist harmoniously with an already Renaissance setting: the throne, for example, lightened by Gothic tracery has a solid architectural structure. Thanks to the tonal contrasts, the body of Jesus has a sculptural quality, almost as though it was taken from the antique, a debt to Donatello’s works in Padua, while the faces of the angels have a roundness and softness that recall Jacopo Bellini.

 

Masterpiece: 
false
AC/DC: 
DC