Giacomo Guardi - 3501a, b, c

Titolo: 
Imaginary Landscape with Pond and Tower; The Fondamenta Nuove; The Rio of Sant’Alvise and the Island of San Secondo
Numero di Inventario: 
3501a 3501b 3501c
Tipologia: 
paintings
Collezione: 

Painting

Classe iconografica: 
Landscape
Parole chiave soggetto: 
landscape
Venice
Motivo attribuzione: 
bibliography
Autore, ambito, luogo di produzione: 
Giacomo Guardi (1764-1835)
Ambito e luogo di produzione: 
Venice
Venezia
Veneto
Italy
Pubblicazione: 
Si
Periodo: 
1800
Datazione specifica: 
1800-1810
Libri correlati: 
Data di Ingresso: 
1973
Acquisizione: 
Margherita Visconti Venosta
Tipo di acquisizione: 
donation
Tipo di collocazione: 
on display
Collocazione: 
Visconti Venosta Room

      

 The first painting shows an imaginary landscape with a circular tower in front of a small pond. In the foreground we can see a figure painted like a small dot and a man on horseback going quietly on his way.
 
The second tempera portrays the most western stretch of the Fondamenta Nuove in Venice, with the Sacca della Misericordia and the body of the Casino degli Spiriti, which stretches over the lagoon. The scene is animated by small figures lightly hinted at by short touches of the brush and by a gondola and other sailing boats. The sheet on the back bears the signature and the words: "Veduta delle Fondamenta Nuove di faccia Campalto / P(er) recapito all’Ospedaletto in calle del Peruchier al N. 5245 dimandar / Giacomo de Guardi."

The third tempera depicts the far end of Rio di Sant’Alvise towards the lagoon and the island of San Secondo with the church’s bell tower and the convent, no longer visible today. A number of boats are moored and a gondola is progressing down the canal. On the back there is the signature and the words: "Veduta delle Chiovere a S. Alvise / P(er) recapito all’Ospedaletto in calle del Peruchier al N. 5245 dimandar / Giacomo de Guardi."

Giacomo Guardi devoted himself to landscapes and to views of Venice, like his father Francesco, from whom he often drew inspiration. But, differently from his father’s views, in the drawings and few paintings attributable to Giacomo Venice looks like a provincial city. Even the inscription on the back of two of them with his address shows to what extent works like this had become commercial in the first decade of the 19th century.
M.G.


 

AC/DC: 
DC