Tuscan painter (Firenze) 16th century - inv. 197

Tuscan painter (Firenze), 16th century

Portrait of a Man (Presumed Portrait of Giacomo Baggarotti)
1520 c.
  
52,5 x 44,5 cm
inscription
"JACOB(U)S. BAGGAROTT(U)S. A. SECRETIS. PRINCIPIS. PISA / URI. COSTANTI. SFORCCIE. AC. DUCIS. / MEDIOLANI. 1489"
1879 bequest Gian Giacomo Poldi Pezzoli
Inv. 197

not on display


The man portrayed is wearing a white shirt under a dark jacket and a beret with the brim just catching his left ear; he is holding a glove, barely visible. The lower edge was trimmed, thus partly eliminating his right arm.
The sitter’s possible identity is hinted at by the inscription on the verso, written in an 18th- to 19th-century hand. It bears the name of Giacomo Baggarotti, of whom nothing is known, together with that of Costanzo Sforza and the date, 1489. But Sforza (1447–1483), cited as lord of Pesaro and of Milan, in actual fact had no role in the Milanese duchy and was already dead in 1489. It is thus possible that the inscription was added to ennoble the sitter and enhance the value of the portrait.
Elements of the sitter’s clothes provide the first basis for dating the work. A similar shirt and jacket can be found in a number of portraits from the second and third decades of the 16th century and the type of headdress can be seen in various works by Rosso Fiorentino, Andrea del Sarto, Titian and Sebastiano dal Piombo.
An echo of Rosso Fiorentino’s portrait style of around 1520 is visible in the features of the face, which also resembles the work of Jacopino del Conte to a certain extent, trained in Florence during the 1520s in Andrea del Sarto’s workshop.

M.M.