Ansano di Michele Ciampanti (attributed to) - inv. 1549

Titolo: 
Portrait of a Man
Numero di Inventario: 
1549
Tipologia: 
paintings
Collezione: 

Painting

Classe iconografica: 
Portrait
Parole chiave soggetto: 
portrait of a man
Motivo attribuzione: 
stylistic analysis
Autore, ambito, luogo di produzione: 
Attributed to Ansano di Michele Ciampanti (active 16th century)
Specifiche attribuzione: 
attributed to
Ambito e luogo di produzione: 
Lucca
Tuscany
Italy
Toscana
Pubblicazione: 
Si
Periodo: 
1500
Datazione specifica: 
1500-1510
Libri correlati: 
Data di Ingresso: 
1879
Acquisizione: 
Gian Giacomo Poldi Pezzoli
Tipo di acquisizione: 
bequest
Tipo di collocazione: 
on display
Collocazione: 
Perugino Room

The panel shows a young man against a dark background, according to a model derived from Flemish portrait painting, very popular in Italian Renaissance. The man’s gaze and traces of two metal hinges on the wood suggest that this work was part of a diptych. Although the features are a little idealised, the figure has an imposing presence and an expressive face: his closed mouth conveys the idea of a resolute man. Shadows ticken on the eyelids, the throat, around the nose and emphasise the high cheekbones and structure of the hand, where the veins have been delicately picked out. His fingers clasp the lapels of his cloak, creating an effect of depth, a gesture typical of late fifteenth-century Tuscan painting. More precisely, the work may come from the area of Lucca and has been  assigned to Ansano di Michele Ciampanti. Already known as the Maestro di San Filippo, the artist was a pupil of his father Michele and is mentioned several times in documents, especially in the sixteenth century, when he had most probably taken over the family workshop. A further clue to the provenance of this portrait is a coat of arms that emerged on the back of the panel after cleaning. It shows a tree with fruit flanked by two bears, perhaps bearing some relation to the Orsucci family.

F.A.
H.G.
 

AC/DC: 
DC